Adam Grant

2017 Session | Option B: Finding Joy in the Face of Adversity

After the sudden death of her husband, Sheryl Sandberg felt certain she and her children would never feel pure joy again. Her friend Adam Grant, a psychologist at Wharton, told her there are concrete steps people can take to recover and rebound from life-shattering experiences. We are not born with a fixed amount of resilience. It is a muscle that everyone can build. Option B combines Sheryl’s personal insights with Adam’s eye-opening research, exploring how a broad range of people have overcome adversity. In this session, Adam will share real-life stories to reveal the capacity of the human spirit to persevere and to rediscover joy. Attendees will learn how to help others in crisis, develop compassion for ourselves, raise strong children, and create resilient families, communities, and workplaces. Participants will walk away with strategies and inspiration to apply these learnings to everyday struggles, allowing you to brave whatever lies ahead. We all live some form of Option B.

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Adam Grant on the Kind of Giving That Gets You Ahead

Grant, AdamBeing Masters-of-the-Universe-ruthless is so last century. Now, most of us know that nice guys (and gals) do come in first, more so than cutthroats, thanks to Adam Grant’s New York Times bestseller Give and Take. And soon, with the February release of his new book, Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World, we’ll stop suppressing our maverick sides, too. Here, the Wharton professor talks about the kind of giving that gets you ahead, good karma and the best office holiday gifts. Read More

CFW SURVEY: ‘I Care’ and the Other Reasons You Do ‘Office Housework’

stock 853Editing a colleague’s report, taking meeting notes, refilling the printer paper tray—the non-job-description stuff you do at work to help someone, your team or the company at large has a name. “Office housework”—and as at home, the bulk of it falls to women, who mostly do it to little acknowledgment, let alone acclaim, reported Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant in a recent New York Times article. What’s more, they say, it’s another example of gender bias: Men are praised and rewarded if they pitch in, while women are penalized for not helping.

But is office housework that widespread a burden and do women do it because we have to? We asked our readers and a whopping 2,218 of you responded. You have strong feelings about the topic, ranging from resentment to bemusement. Here’s what you said: Read More

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